Tiny camera, big results

pillcam

 

The Endoscopy Department is excited to introduce a new procedure called PillCam SB. PillCam SB was initially cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2001. The vitamin-sized capsule provides a way to visualize, monitor and diagnose small bowel abnormalities including abnormalities associated with obscure GI bleeding (OGIB), iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and Crohn’s disease. Stretched out, the human gut is about 25 feet long. Endoscopy and colonoscopy are good tools for examining the two ends, but there are about 20 feet in the middle — the small intestine — that doctors have a hard time seeing some of these digestive diseases that are localized in just one part of small intestine. This is where the PillCam is useful. This patient-friendly tool has been validated by more than 1,600 peer-reviewed studies.

The patient will come to the Endoscopy department to swallow a camera that is incased in a capsule that is in the shape of a large vitamin. A sensor belt is worn by the patient for 8 hours on the day of capsule ingestion. The belt is communicating with the capsule and downloading images onto a data recorder in the belt. A new version of the capsule camera, just approved by the Food and Drug Administration, adjusts for how quickly the camera is moving inside the gut, slowing down and speeding up the rate at which it takes pictures. That gives doctors an even more complete view inside the intestine.

The patient is allowed to return to normal activity during the day while wearing the belt. The patient returns to the Endoscopy department after 8 hours. The Endoscopy nurse will take the recorder off the patient and download the images for the physician to view.

Please contact the Endoscopy department if you are interested in learning more about the PillCam SB (660) 890-7243.

About Craig Thompson

I am a young professional with two great sons, and I work in the healthcare setting. I am employed in hospital administration and serve as Chief Operating Officer at Golden Valley Memorial Healthcare in Clinton, Missouri. These are challenging and exciting times in healthcare and my blog will focus on healthcare, raising boys or being raised by boys, and living in mid America.
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